Home Equality & Justice Philippine bishop welcomes Taiwan’s decision to increase wages of migrant workers

Philippine bishop welcomes Taiwan’s decision to increase wages of migrant workers

Effective August 10, the monthly pay for migrant workers in Taiwan is at NT$20,000 (US$665.70) from the previous NT$17,000 (US$565.90)

A Catholic bishop in the Philippines welcomed the decision of the government of Taiwan to raise the monthly minimum pay of migrant home-based caregivers and household service workers.

“This is indeed a good news,” said Bishop Ruperto Santos, vice chairman of the Episcopal Commission for the Pastoral Care of Migrants and Itinerant People.

The prelate lauded the “caring and kind gestures of the Taiwan government,” saying that with the salary increase, “we see how they value and appreciate the selfless services and exemplary works” of Filipino migrant workers.



“We are grateful for the concern and compassion of the Taiwan government,” said the bishop in an interview over Radio Veritas 846.

“Following this praise-worthy gestures of Taiwan, let us be more proactive and more efficient to promote the welfare of [overseas Filipino workers] and to protect their rights,” said Bishop Santos.

Effective August 10, the monthly pay for migrant workers in Taiwan is at NT$20,000 (US$665.70) from the previous NT$17,000 (US$565.90).

Migrant workers who had signed contracts with their employers prior to August 10 are not covered by the new rate.

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Philippine Labor Attaché to Taiwan Cesar Chavez Jr. said the 17.6 percent increase in monthly pay is the first granted by the Taiwan government since 2015.

Chavez also said that the Taiwan labor ministry has advised Taiwanese employers that to encourage worker retention, salaries should be increased by NT$1,000 after three years and another NT$1,000 for workers who are six years in service.

For low-income and low-middle income employers to be able to pay the new wage rate to their workers, they will be entitled to a NT$3,000 monthly government subsidy for the next three years or a maximum of NT$108,000.

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